Black & Blueberry Sorbet

There is something to the lovely month of August which is really laid back. Even if you really wanted to cook "big time", it's too hot to do so and there is too much to do outside that it is even little pointless to try. So let's go with the flow, slide the fip-flops on, dive in the bushes, forage for blackberries and turn the yield into a sorbet.

But before I get to the recipe and though schools are out, I can't resist to play teacher so pay attention:
black·ber·ry (blkbr)
n. from the rose family has the raspberry for cousin.
1. Any of various shrubs of the genus Rubus, having usually prickly stems, compound leaves, and an aggregate fruit of small drupelets.
2. The fruit of these plants, usually black, purple, or deep red.
3. blackberries also called brambles
blue·ber·ry (blbr)
n. also called bilberry and cousin to the cranberry
1. Any of numerous plants of the genus Vaccinium, having white to reddish, urn-shaped or tubular flowers and edible blue to blue-black berries.
2. The fruit of any of these plants.
The blackberries used for this recipe where picked in the Dockland's. London's financial district which shelters a strange fauna of stressed office workers but also a large wilderness area with a city-farm, miles of bridle paths and lots of great flora.
The blueberry meringues added for "marshmallow" effect were my dad's last present which he posted while staying in the Alps, where blueberries are plentiful and used in a myriad of recipes.

As you will not have this in your pantry, the alternative is plain meringue. There is also the small matter of consistency. This recipe is very concentrated hence the dark colouring of the sorbet. You might want something lighter in which case use 250g of sugar and 240 ml of water.

 Blackberry Sorbet

  • 300g/10½oz caster sugar
  •  a drop of water
  •  500g blackberries
  •  1/2 lemon


    1. Place the blackberries, sugar and water into a saucepan over a low heat. Cook gently to soften the fruit.
    2. Pass the blackberry mixture through a sieve into a bowl, you will then get a purée
    3. Churn in an ice-cream maker according to instructions.
    This is a "simple and in season" recipe perfect for Fabulicious Food Blog event this month.

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