Sage and Polenta

When was the last time you used polenta? when was the first time you ate polenta? Unless you were born in Savoie or in Italy, polenta might not even be part of your repertoire. Polenta isn't an universal ingredient  like pasta, noodles or rice. If Italian often claim to have "the best of", it can't really be said that polenta is the best of grains.
 

A Pebble Soup Recipe, Sage & Polenta Bread, muffin, cake

 
So why post about it, here is the list (I so love list):
 
Why is Polenta an ingredient to keep in the pantry?:
 
With a good recipe, well seasoned and served in small portions, polenta is a tasty addition to a meal.
It's cheap.
Versatile: breakfast, accompaniment, snack, bread etc....
Convenient  on a busy night when you havn't had time to plan nor shop.
 
Then there is the invention factor. Let me explain, polenta is bland enough to be moulded into more or less whatever is required, within reason.
I have got a "as time goes by" recipe which I've used since my teens. Polenta Nest with Creamy Mushrooms. It was born on a poor budget week. What do you do with a small tin of creamed mushrooms? Nestled the content in a flavoured polenta ball-shaped as a nest and there you have it: a prince's ransom.

That recipe, with time evolved into a king's ransom and turned into a more sophisticated version Shiitake & Polenta.
 
There are similarities with the following recipe which is based on a muffin recipe but ended up as a sort of bread/cake, out of necessity. So do forgive me it I don't give it a denomination and just call it
 
Sage and Polenta
Ingredients
take 1/2h to prepare and cook

170 g instant polenta

75 g all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
2 Tbsp sage leaves chopped fresh is better, dried will do, a mixture if you wish.
Keep a few extra leaves to place on the top as deco
salt, black pepper
360 g sour cream
2 eggs
Olive oil for the skillet
 
Method
 
Preheat the oven to 180ºC/160ºC fan
Place all the ingredients in a bowl and mix well to combine.
In a skillet lightly fry the extra sage leaves, remove
Add a little more oil replace with the polenta mixture.
Place the sage leave on the top
Bake for 15-20 minutes or until cooked.
Serve hot or cold

4 comments:

Phil in the Kitchen said...

I'm definitely in favour of a bread/cake combination especially with sage. This sounds lovely. I must admit that the first few times that I had polenta were in London restaurants many, many years ago. Despite being quite trendy, the restaurants produced rather unpleasant, tasteless polenta and it took me years to get over that. I now know that it can be delicious.

Solange Berchemin said...

I so agree, some polenta experiences can be dire, I had rather too many myself but sometimes a simple fried polenta can also be heavenly.
thanks for dropping by.

Emmyw said...

I wish more people knew about polenta! I've served it up to friends and family a couple of times after it became a staple of my university food cupboard. They always seem scared by it though!

I think it can be incredibly tasty.

(Particulalry overly salty and fried to make polenta chips - delish!)

Solange Berchemin said...

oh a friend of us, Glenn,cooks a fab overly salty fried polenta triangles, that is delicious. I will be trying one day. So much to cook, so little time.
Thanks for your comment.

si

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