Daring Bakers' March challenge: Lasagne












































This month our challenge was to make Lasagne and in true DB's style here is the secret code:

The March 2009 challenge is hosted by Mary of Beans and Caviar, Melinda of Melbourne Larder and Enza of Io Da Grande. They have chosen Lasagne of Emilia-Romagna from The Splendid Table by Lynne Rossetto Kasper as the challenge.

We had to make the pasta by hand from scratch. I cheated a little bit and posted a SOS on freecycle. Tatiana came to the rescue, I was able to borrow a pasta maker. Not only did I make lasagne but "Bigginies", newly but adequatly named because they look like very large spagettis and even pasta-only-gnocchis.

It took me a whole afternoon but the result was magnificient. I never tasted pasta dough that thin, it melted in the mouth.

So is it worth making your own pasta? yes is my answer

I would recommend to investigate a little the machines on the market. The one I borrowed was very difficult to clean and so cumbsome that you would need a very large kitchen to host it on a permanent base.

Recipe for Spinach Egg Pasta (Pasta Verde)



Preparation: 45 minutes
Makes enough for 6 to 8 first course servings or 4 to 6 main course servings,
equivalent to 1 pound (450g) dried boxed pasta.
  • 2 jumbo eggs (2 ounces/60g or more)
  • 10 ounces (300g) fresh spinach, rinsed dry, and finely chopped; or
  • 6 ounces (170g) frozen chopped spinach, defrosted and squeezed dry
  • 3&1/2 cups (14 ounces/400g) all purpose unbleached (plain) flour (organic stone ground preferred)
working the dough by hand would require mixing, kneading, stretching and thinning, here are the instructions

Mixing the dough:

Mound the flour in the center of your work surface and make a well in the middle. Add the eggs and spinach. Use a wooden spoon to beat together the eggs and spinach. Then gradually start incorporating shallow scrapings of flour from the sides of the well into the liquid. As you work more and more flour into the liquid, the well’s sides may collapse. Use a pastry scraper to keep the liquids from running off and to incorporate the last bits of flour into the dough. Don’t worry if it looks like a hopelessly rough and messy lump.

Kneading:

With the aid of the scraper to scoop up unruly pieces, start kneading the dough. Once it becomes a cohesive mass, use the scraper to remove any bits of hard flour on the work surface – these will make the dough lumpy. Knead the dough for about 3 minutes. Its consistency should be elastic and a little sticky. If it is too sticky to move easily, knead in a few more tablespoons of flour. Continue kneading about 10 minutes, or until the dough has become satiny, smooth, and very elastic. It will feel alive under your hands. Do not shortcut this step. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap, and let it relax at room temperature 30 minutes to 3 hours.Stretching and

Thinning:

If using an extra-long rolling pin work with half the dough at a time. With a regular-length rolling pin, roll out a quarter of the dough at a time and keep the rest of the dough wrapped. Lightly sprinkle a large work surface with flour. The idea is to stretch the dough rather than press down and push it. Shape it into a ball and begin rolling out to form a circle, frequently turning the disc of dough a quarter turn. As it thins outs, start rolling the disc back on the pin a quarter of the way toward the center and stretching it gently sideways by running the palms of your hands over the rolled-up dough from the center of the pin outward. Unroll, turn the disc a quarter turn, and repeat. Do twice more.Stretch and even out the center of the disc by rolling the dough a quarter of the way back on the pin. Then gently push the rolling pin away from you with one hand while holding the sheet in place on the work surface with the other hand. Repeat three more times, turning the dough a quarter turn each time.Repeat the two processes as the disc becomes larger and thinner. The goal is a sheet of even thickness. For lasagne, the sheet should be so thin that you can clearly see your hand through it and see colours. Cut into rectangles about 4 by 8 inches (10 x 20 cm). Note: Enza says that transparency is a crucial element of lasagne pasta and the dough should be rolled as thinly as possible. She says this is why her housekeeper has such strong arms!Dry the pasta at room temperature and store in a sealed container or bag.

3 comments:

Hilary said...

Good job! I found this challenge exhausting, but the result was certainly yummy, wasn't it?

MaryMary said...

I agree that it was a lot of work but oh so worth it. Great job!

Solange said...

Thank you both for your comment, you know what I almost gave it 3/4 of the way it would have been such a waste.

si

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